Subscribe to our Newsletter

If you would like to subscribe to receive our regular newsletter for all important events and updates, please complete the information below.

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image by Dan Alcade under a CC BY-NC-ND license.

Birkbeck Alumni Directing New Plays

Posted by on 11:41 am in News, Our Students | 0 comments

Birkbeck Alumni Directing New Plays

We're delighted to share some good news about recent Bikrbeck alumni from our MFA Theatre Directing, directed by Rob Swain, Professor of Theatre Practice. Lyndsey Turner, who graduated in 2007, is directing Dylan Thomas' Under Milk Wood at the Oilver Theatre in the National Theatre. The Covid-secure live performances will run from 16 June – 24 July 2021. Lyndsey was the first woman to win the Olivier award for Best Director and is an associate director of the National Theatre. Info here: https://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/shows/under-milk-wood Atri Banerjee, who graduated in 2018 and won The Stage Debut award for Directing in 2019, is directing a new production of Harm at the Bush Theatre. This new play by Bruntwood Prize award winner Phoebe Eclair-Powell (WINK, Fury) and starring Kelly Gough (Broadchurch, Marcella), is a thrilling and razor-sharp twisted comedy on the corrosive effects of social media and isolation. Running from 17 May – 26 June 2021, Harm is made possible thanks to the support of the Government’s Culture Recovery Fund. Info here: https://www.bushtheatre.co.uk/event/harm/ Diane Page, who is a graduate of Birkecbk's BA Theatre Studies and completed the MFA Theatre Directing in 2019, is co-directing Out West with the Lyric Hammersmith Theatre's Artistic Director, Rachel O'Riordan. Out West comprises the world premiere of three new short plays by three of the UK’s leading playwrights – Tanika Gupta, Simon Stephens and Roy Williams and runs from 18 June – 24 July 2021. All rooted in West London, the plays explore race, identity and our sense of place and purpose, presented together as a triple bill. Info here: https://lyric.co.uk/shows/out-west/ Jonathan O'Boyle, who graduated in 2013 and won awards for his production of the musical The Last Five Years, is directing the musical this September as it transfers to West End, having been presented at Southwark Playhouse in 2019. It will run at the Vaudeville Theatre from 23 September 2021 for a limited season. The production at Southwark Playhouse was nominated for eight Offie Awards and won two for Best Director and Best Musical Production. Oli Higginson was nominated for a Stage Debut Award for his performance as Jamie. Info here: https://britishtheatre.com/the-last-five-years-transfers-vaudeville-theatre-23-september-2021/ Congratulations to all of our Birkbeck alumni and we hope that the new productions run smoothly amid Covid restrictions! For more information about Birkbeck's MFA Theatre Directing, please visit the programme's homepage. For more information about the Birkbeck Centre for Contemporary Theatre, please visit the centre's...

read more

Radioastronomy (here comes the Sun)

Posted by on 7:59 pm in News | 0 comments

Radioastronomy (here comes the Sun)

‘Radioastronomy (here comes the Sun)’   Digital practitioner Inês Rebelo (Birkbeck) invites you to contribute to a new digital piece on our nearest star – the Sun.   Where: online, submissions by email When: 12 May until 4 June 2021 ‘Radioastronomy (here comes the Sun)’ uses sound and drawing to evoke an encounter with our closest star. Capturing the Sun’s unheard voice from NASA’s recordings, these otherworldly tunes affect drawings over-layered in time. They remind us of our vital connection with the Sun and become alerts for climate emergency. As part of Birkbeck’s Arts Weeks 2021, ‘Radioastronomy (here comes the Sun)’ invites you to contribute to a new digital piece in the making titled ‘Sunscape’. This new piece takes the form of a collective screensaver where participants submit images to reflect on what we can do to slow down climate-warming caused by humans.    1 – Sun Look at the Sun (not with a naked eye!) Look at the Sun: it’s vital. Its gravity holds our planetary system together. Its energy brings heat, warmth, life in blooming crops, allows us to see in colours of rainbow and can burn to ashes, silently and invisibly. This much we know today: we know we can see the sun – in detail. But, can we hear the Sun? Are we really listening? Listen now.    2 – Emergency  2020 was not only Covid-19 year, it was also, yet again, one of the hottest years on record. Solar radiation levels fluctuate in cycles of eleven years each, going up and down, but the observed warming of past decades is too large to be caused by solar activity alone. Indeed, global scientific consensus recognises that climate change (including rising temperatures and other events) is real and human activities that release polluting gases from burning coal, oil or gas are the main cause. Much like glass walls of a greenhouse, gases in Earth’s atmosphere let the sunlight in but also prevent the Sun’s heat from escaping. As humans continue to add heat-trapping greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide for the most part, our planet heats up to dangerous levels, energetically unbalanced. If this pattern continues unchanged and average global temperatures increase above 1.5°C, the consequences are dangerously unpredictable.  Thank you for listening.    3 – Screensaver Due to the way it is named – screensaver – it is common to believe this techy sounding thing might save energy on a screen. After all, a screen needs energy to emit light. That is how it produces graphics of all sorts. But in fact, a screensaver doesn’t save any energy at all. Alas, like many other things shouting around, big and small, a screensaver is not to be taken at face value. A screensaver is a small program that can run in our computers, paradoxically triggered by our inactivity – it starts when we are have not used our machine for some time. When triggered, a screensaver fades out the current screen view and replaces it with new visuals, pictures or even text, often sequenced in an animated fashion with more or less sophisticated transition effects. These are a fascinating facet of our saturated (over)use of screen time.  Can you get your screensaver to come up? If not, read on.    4 – Participate  Let’s make ‘Sunscape’ a screensaver of our own. Let’s make tech together, for...

read more

Writing, Human Rights & Literature

Posted by on 9:35 am in News | 0 comments

Writing, Human Rights & Literature

      Writing, Rights and Literature (Arts Weeks 2021) When: 18 May 2021, 18:00-19:15 BST Venue: Online (online booking required) Book your place Lyndsey Stonebridge (University of Birmingham) and Julia Bell (Birkbeck) join Agnes Woolley to discuss the need for literary communities, political truth telling, and the relationship between writing and rights. What is the relationship between writing and rights? Join Prof. Lyndsey Stonebridge and Birkbeck’s Julia Bell to debate the burning issue of how literature can register – but also shape a wider and more creative recognition of what ‘rights’ implies. Chaired by Dr Agnes Woolley (Birkbeck, Director of MA Migration Literatures and Cultures).    Lyndsey Stonebridge’s polemical new book Writing and Righting (OUP, 2020) looks at the connection between literature and human rights, making the case for the moral and political value of literature in rightless times. In conversation with Julia Bell, Lyndsey will discuss the need for literary communities and political truth telling at a time when the language of rights is devalued.    Lyndsey Stonebridge is Interdisciplinary Professor of Humanities and Human Rights at the University of Birmingham. Her recent books include the prizewinning Placeless People: Rights, Writing, and Refugees (OUP, 2018), and The Judicial Imagination: Writing after Nuremberg (EUP, 2011). Lyndsey is currently collaborating on a creative and interdisciplinary project with refugees and host communities in Lebanon, Jordan, and Turkey, Refugee Hosts. A regular broadcaster and media commentator, she has written for The New Statesman, Prospect, and The New Humanist.    Julia Bell is a writer and Reader in Creative Writing at Birkbeck. Her creative work includes poetry, lyric essays, short stories and novels. Her most recent book is Radical Attention: An Essay on the Battle for our Attention in the Age of Distraction (Peninsula Press, 2020).    How to join this event  This event takes place online. You will receive an email one hour before the start of the event with a link to join. The email will come from messenger@bbk.ac.uk – please check your junk/spam inbox if you have not received the email one hour before the start of the event.    Find out more about Arts Weeks 2021 and book more events. To find out more about our MA Migration Literatures and Cultures that Dr Agnes Woolley directs, please click here.   Photo by Seven Shooter on...

read more

Interactive Narrative Workshop

Posted by on 8:29 am in News, Our Students | 0 comments

Interactive Narrative Workshop

Interactive Narrative Workshop with Dr Alan Trotter & Dr Mark Blacklock (Arts Weeks 2021) Starts: 13 May 2021, 19:30  Finishes: 20 May 2021, 20:30  Venue: Online  Book your place What is interactive digital narrative and what tools are available to writers? As part of Arts Weeks 2021, Birkbeck is running a series of two hands-on workshops, run by Dr Alan Trotter, author of Muscle (Faber, 2019) and All This Rotting, a digital story for phones, and Dr Mark Blacklock, Senior Lecturer at Birkbeck and the author of the novels Hinton (Granta, 2020) and I'm Jack (Granta, 2015). The workshops are suitable for beginners and will guide participants through first encounters with freely available software tools such as Twine, Twitter Bots Done Quick, and Telescopic Text, while also introducing the history and theory of digital narrative.  These workshops are generously supported by the Experimental Collaborative Humanities Network. Places limited to 20 on a first-come, first-served basis. Attendees must be available for both workshops: 13 May 19.30 20 May 19.30 Booking one ticket gives you access to both workshops. The 20 May workshop features feedback on draft piece made by participants.   Dr Alan Trotter wrote the novel Muscle (Faber, 2019). He studied Philosophy and English Literature at the University of Edinburgh as an undergraduate; he has a Creative Writing MLitt (distinction) and a PhD in English Literature, both from the University of Glasgow. His PhD included creative and critical writing (the dissertation was on what it called 'Body Texts': work in print and electronic literature, that makes unusual use of its form): it was supported by Arts and Humanities Research Council funding throughout, as well as with an AHRC-supported placement at the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. His short fiction has been published by Somesuch Stories, Under the Influence, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and the Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 3. He has also published a digital story for phones called All This Rotting with Editions at Play (a collaboration between Google Play and the publisher Visual Editions). He has worked for publishers including Penguin, Vintage, Granta, and currently works at Canongate Books, and is writing two novellas.  Dr Mark Blacklock is Senior Lecturer in Modern and Contemporary Literature at Birkbeck College, University of London, and a novelist. His most recent novel, Hinton (Granta, 2020), was longlisted for the Walter Scott Prize, and described in The Guardian as ‘a singular literary achievement.’ His first novel, I’m Jack, a fictionalised autobiography of Wearside Jack, was published by Granta in 2015 and optioned for a film that was never made. Mark’s monograph, The Emergence of the Fourth Dimension, a literary and cultural history of higher-dimensioned space, was published by Oxford University Press in 2018. The essay ‘Weirding the Void: Higher Spatial Form in Weird Fiction’ was shortlisted for the Science Fiction Research Association’s Pioneer Award the same year.  Find out more about Arts Weeks 2021 and book more events....

read more

Aliens, Vampires, Surrogates

Posted by on 12:50 pm in News | 0 comments

Aliens, Vampires, Surrogates

                          Online Roundtable Aliens, Vampires, Surrogates: Revolutionising the Gestational Workplace 28 April 2021, 6-7.30pm BST online (booking required)   We’re delighted to welcome Dr Sophie Lewis (Brooklyn Institute for Social Research) and Katie Stone (Birkbeck) who will join Dr Caroline Edwards for a live roundtable discussion of gestational labour. The commodified, often outlawed and invisibilised labour of commercial surrogacy highlights the way in which capitalist biotech moves vulnerable surrogate mothers across borders in a transnational network of business partnership. This gestational workplace – the precarious “pregnancy gig economy” – demands that we reimagine pregnancy, social reproduction, binary gender and the family. We will consider how various monstrous subjects found in utopian and science fiction, from vampires, aliens and parasites to bioengineered Frankensteinian creatures, might offer suggestive glimpses of the kind of gestational communism we all deserve.    Book your ticket here   Speaker bios: Dr Sophie Lewis is a visiting scholar at The Alice Paul Center for Research on Gender, Sexuality and Women at the University of Pennsylvania, and a member of the teaching faculty of the Philadelphia branch of the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research. She is the author of Full Surrogacy Now: Feminism Against Family (Verso Books, 2019), which Donna Haraway hailed as “the seriously radical cry for full gestational justice that I long for.” Sophie’s scholarship operates in the spheres of trans feminist cultural criticism and queer social reproduction theory, notably around utopian critiques of the family, Marxism, and Black and abolitionist feminisms. Her research currently focuses on the etiologies of eugenic, bioconservative and imperial feminisms, including narratives of so-called white slavery past and present, femonationalism, and trans-exclusionary femocratism. Katie Stone is a PhD student at Birkbeck, University of London. Her thesis explores childhood and utopianism as imagined in science fiction. It seeks to put mainstream science fiction into conversation with feminist, queer and decolonial critical and creative work in order to interrogate the genre’s complicity with various structures of oppression. Katie is co-founder of the research network ‘Utopian Acts’ whose work has been featured in a special issue of Studies in Arts and Humanities Journal which she and Raphael Kabo have edited. Katie has written for Foundation, Fantastika and SFRA Review and she is one of the founding members of the research collective ‘Beyond Gender’. She is on Twitter as @cyborg_feminist and @UtopianActs. Dr Caroline Edwards is Senior Lecturer in Modern & Contemporary Literature at Birkbeck, University of London where she is Director of the Centre for Contemporary Literature. She has published widely on science fiction and utopian literature, contemporary literary form, the philosophy of time, and radical subjectivities. Caroline is author of Utopia and the Contemporary British Novel (Cambridge University Press, 2019), co-editor of China Miéville: Critical Essays (Gylphi, 2015) and Maggie Gee: Critical Essays (Gylphi, 2015), and is editing The Cambridge Companion to British Utopian Literature and Culture, 1945-2020 (forthcoming in 2022). Her research has featured on BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 3, BBC One television, in the Guardian, the New Statesman, SFX Magazine and in a dedicated exhibition at the Museum of London. Caroline is currently writing a book about science fiction and ecocatastrophe. You can watch a recording of the live event below or on our CCL YouTube channel.     Featured image by Boston Public Library on...

read more

Transitions 9 Programme

Posted by on 2:01 pm in News | 0 comments

Transitions 9 Programme

Transitions 9: New Directions in Comics Studies 8-10 April 2021 Programme (Time zone: BST/UTC+1) THURSDAY 8 April 2021 15:00 – 15:15 Welcome   15:15 – 16:45 Panel 1 1.1: Periodicals 1.2: Bodies Sara Dallavalle Comics Magazines: Not only Comics  but also Criticism  Jonathan Bass The Rube Goldberg Case: The Panel  as Paradigm in Newspaper Comics and  New York Dada Kristian Hellesund Migration in Three Early American  Newspaper Comics Jose L Garcia Politics of Body Prostheses, Disability,  and Replacement in Aaron Diaz’s  Dresden Codak  Sharmistha Chatterjee Examining the Diseased Material  Body in Stitches Eszter Szép Drawing and Transforming the Body  in Ken Dahl’s Monsters   16:45 – 17:00 Break   17:00 – 18:15 Keynote Frames of Thought Dr Nick Sousanis (San Francisco State University)   FRIDAY 9 April 2021 10:00 – 10:15 Day’s Welcome   10:15– 11:45 Panel 2 2.1: Adaptations and Pastiche 2.2: Cultural Memory Audrey Chan Alberto Breccia’s Parody of  Futurist Paintings in Graphic  Narratives Miloš Tasić and Dušan  Stamenkovic Visualising an Oral Epic:  Lobačev’s Comic Book Ženidba  Dušanova Oskari Rantala V for Pissed-offed-ness vs.  Vendetta A case of anti-immigrant  subversion of comics intertexts Jakob F. Dittmar and Anders Høg  Hansen Pasts renewed in new German graphic  storytelling Lena Holec Ravnikar Preservation of Slovene Literary History in  Comics  Hakan Keleş Expanded frame, time and space: 80’s  Urban Atmosphere at Arabacıoğlu’s  “Panorama” Pages   11:45 – 13:30 Panel 3 3.1: Curating, Constructing and  Countering Women's Histories 3.2: Practice-based Research Neha Yadav Whose Line is it Anyway:  Graphic Anthology Drawing the  Line as a Counter-narrative to  Mainstream Rape Reportage in  India Andrea Aramburú-Villavisencio Curating the Ordinary:  Relationality and Affect in Latin  American Women’s  Autobiographical Comics Esther McManus Constructing Inclusive Histories:  Reflections on the temporality of  comics and activist archives Natasa Thoudam In Search of a Form while Inventing a  Language of Subversion through  Stereotypes Daniel Merlin Goodbrey How to Cheat at Comics: Digital  alternatives to traditional techniques for  comic illustration Irina Richards Narrating cultural heritage through comics:  a graphic investigation into witch-hare  folklore of Wales   13:30 – 14:00 Lunch   14:00 – 15:30 Panel 4 4.1 4.2 Individual & Community Driss Faddouli Moroccan Facebookers and the  Visual Rhetoric of Political  Negation Ibtisam Ahmed The Utopian Critical Mass of  Spider-Man  Barbara Eggert Family Issues In Early Moomin  Comic Strips Processes and products of drawing Clari Searle Creating ‘Funnies’: how to build an  effective creative process for Higher  Education pedagogy Peter Hebden The Stuff of Dreams: Objects and  Disorientation in the work of Julie Doucet  and Anders Nilsen Dom Davies Fracking Hell! Joe Sacco’s Seismic Lines   15:30 – 15:45 Break   15:45 – 17:00 Keynote Comics Studies and Education in Germany, 1950-2020 Prof Dr Sylvia Kesper-Biermann (Universität Hamburg)   SATURDAY 9 April 2021 10:00 – 10:15 Day’s Welcome   10:15– 11:45 Panel 5 5.1 5.2 Graphic Medicine   Iona Lindsay, Amie Huttie,  Katie Laing, Hisham Khan,  Bryoni Welsh and Frankie  Posner Using comics and Graphic  Medicine to explore and examine  medical student experiences of  training during the evolving  coronavirus outbreak  Lottie Corr A picture of health: Using  Graphic Medicine to cultivate  empathy and widen student  perspectives at medical school Muna Al-Jawad The evolution of comics as a  research method in health  humanities Experiences of Otherness Anna Marta Marini Barrier and the representation of the US  internal/external boundaries Alessia Mangiavillano Fieldwork...

read more

Coastal Dystopias

Posted by on 10:58 am in News | 0 comments

Coastal Dystopias

18 March 2021, 2-3.30pm GMT Online via Zoom (booking required)   CCL Director Dr Caroline Edwards (Birkbeck) will be speaking about "Coastal Dystopias" as part of the Institute for Historical Research (IHR) series on "Coastal Connections." Caroline will join Prof. Dr. Silja Klepp (Kiel), Dr Yi-Chia Chen (UColorado-Denver) and Prof. Dr. Teresa Sabol-Spezio (Independent Scholar, formerly at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society) to discuss how coastal regions have inspired utopian and dystopian anticipations of ravaged future societies set amidst environmental crisis, calamity and apocalyptic devastation. The Coastal Connections series is running in Spring 2021 to extend interdisciplinary research connections relating to coastal histories. It is convened by James L. Smith (University College Cork), Tuba Azeem (Victoria University of Wellington), Melanie Bassett (University of Portsmouth), Elsa Devienne (Northumbria University), Xiaofei Gao (University of Colorado), Joana Gaspar de Freitas (University of Lisbon); Isaac Land (Indiana State University), David Worthington (University of the Highlands and Islands), Hannah Boast (University College Dublin) and Harrie Neal (University of York).   Event description: While traditional histories of shorelines often focused on the triumph of the seaside leisure economy or perhaps on subsistence-related activities such as navigation and fisheries, recent developments have cast a grim shadow on the site at which land and sea meet and have forced scholars to rethink coastal history in a more dystopian light. Beaches, for example, are no longer simply associated with innocence, freedom and sensuality, they are places of refuge—providing shelter for Australians fleeing fires in January 2020—sites of muted or open military conflict—as seen most recently in the case of Varosha in Northern Cyprus—and, most tragically, the last resting place for many refugees attempting the Mediterranean crossing to Europe. In parallel, many artists have recently invested the coast with dystopian scenarios, from Kim Stanley Robinson’s novel New York 2140 to J. A Bayona’s film The Impossible. This phenomenon is actually not as new as it may seem at first sight.  While many utopias have been set at the water’s edge, other narratives engaged with the dramatic quality of the shores with The Beach (1959), a Cold War movie dramatizing a nuclear doomsday, being a prime example. These cultural products remind us that the history of shorelines cannot be reduced to bathing beauties and dazzling resorts. In this seminar session, speakers coming from different disciplines (including history, geography, and literature) will discuss their research into the dystopian qualities of shorelines across the world. They will ask: why have coastlines been the (imagined or real) sites where a diverse array of dystopian scenarios have unfolded? Is there something new about the twentieth century and our present moment that makes coastlines appear particularly dystopian? How can we reconcile utopian/dystopian visions of the shoreline? And, finally, are all coastlines doomed, or are there more constructive ways to think about paths forward? All welcome, this seminar is free to attend but booking is required. Book your place here. For more information about the IHR "Coastal Connections" seminar series, contact: ihr.events@sas.ac.uk. For more information about the MA Contemporary Literature and Culture that Dr Caroline Edwards directs, please see here.   Featured image by Enrapture Captivating Media on...

read more

CFP: Transitions 9 Conference

Posted by on 12:20 pm in News | 0 comments

CFP: Transitions 9 Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS: TRANSITIONS 9 – new directions in comics studies 2021 Online 8-10 April 2021 Hosted By BIRKBECK, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON   Following the cancellation of Transitions 2020, we are delighted to re-announce the call for papers for Transitions 9 in 2021. Transitions is a platform for emerging research in comics that is free to attend and participate. This event is focused towards postgraduate and early career speakers, and draws a diverse crowd of both new and more established researchers, as well as creators, aficionados and other interested parties. Our aim is to build connections between comics scholars working in diverse contexts of research and practice, to provide a platform for productive debate, and to create a space from which further collaborations can emerge. Key note speakers: Prof Dr Sylvia Kesper-Biermann (Universität Hamburg) and Dr Nick Sousanis (San Francisco State University) Respondent(s): TBA Rather than adopting a narrow theme, the shape and identity of the programme will emerge from the submitted papers. We thus welcome abstracts for 20 minute papers, or pre-constituted panels of three, on topics including (but not limited to): Comics, comix, comic strips, graphic novels, manga, manhwa, bande dessinée superheroes, adventure, war, horror, fantasy, crime, romance, humour & other genres; documentary/historical/journalistic comics, autobiographical/biographical modes, graphic medicine politics of representation and inclusion in comics texts and productions, formal approaches, transgressive comics, educational and didactic comics, comics for young adults & children readers and fandoms, creators, comics & the law, publishing histories, web-comics & comics exhibitions, transnational circulation, political economy of comics Since Transitions this year will be held through video conferencing, we ask that presenters record a 20 minute presentation in advance, which will be followed by live q&a sessions for each panel. Further details for pre-recorded presentations will be shared once proposals have been confirmed. As always, Transitions 9 will be free and open to all. Please send your proposal to transitionssymposium@gmail.com. Please attach your abstract of 250-300 words plus a short biographical note (preferably as a Word document), indicating ‘abstract’ in the email subject line and your name in the file’s title. This year we are also seeking volunteers to sketchnote / visually record each panel, in order to compile a visual record of the conference. If you’d be interested in recording a panel, please email us a couple of (low-res) images or a link to an online portfolio at the above address with ‘sketchnoting’ in the subject line. You do not need to be submitting a paper to take part in this. The deadline for submissions is 7 March. We aim to notify applicants by 14 March. With best wishes, The Transitions Team John Miers, Tobias Yu-Kiener, Chantal Cointot and Hallvard...

read more

MIR Live 2021

Posted by on 12:19 pm in News | 0 comments

MIR Live 2021

The CCL's very own Mechanics' Institute Review (MIR) is launching a new online series of evening events, MIRLive. Our first MIRLive of 2021 on Friday 26th February will be headlined by Femi Kayode whose debut novel Lightseekers comes out February 4th, published by Raven Books.  Femi Kayode grew up in Lagos, Nigeria. He studied Clinical Psychology at the University of Ibadan and has worked in advertising over the last two decades. He was a Packard Fellow in Film and Media at the University of Southern California and a Gates-Packard Fellow in International Health at the University of Washington, Seattle. His writing credits include several award-winning works for the stage and screen. In 2017 he was awarded the UEA Literary Festival Scholarship, which helped to fund his MA in Creative Writing Crime Fiction. Whilst studying at UEA, his debut novel Lightseekers won the Little, Brown/UEA Crime Fiction Award. He lives in Namibia with his family. The show starts at 7.30 pm (GMT)   Reading alongside Femi will be: Linda Mannheim Liam Hogan Tom Browning David Plans Stephen Vowles Elizabeth Holli Wood   Watch Live via our Youtube Channel SUBMISSIONS ARE NOW CLOSED. Each event features a range of UK-based writers, from established authors to the next generation. Valuing diversity in literature, MIRLive is an inclusive and inspiring night. It is hosted by writers and comedians Kayleigh Cassidy and Alexandra Petropoulos, so expect a fun and engaging evening. It really is the best place to enjoy fresh writing within a supportive community. Guest authors to date include Bernardine Evaristo, Jonathan Coe, Abi Dare, Louise Hare, Derek Johns, Hari Kunzru, Susan Elderkin, Zoë Fairbairns, Russell Celyn Jones, Peter Hobbs, Benjamin Markovits, Erica Wagner, Marie Phillips, Kate Pullinger, Helen Simpson, Richard T. Kelly, Jeremy Sheldon, Sarah Salway, Jean McNeil, Rich Hall, Julia Bell, Richard Milward, Emer Martin, Blake Morrison, Nii Parkes, Robert Hudson, Amanda Smyth, Chloe Aridjis, Magnus Mills, A.L. Kennedy, Niall O’Sullivan, Alex Preston, Toby Litt, Monique Roffey, Michael Rosen, Mez Packer,  Zoe Gilbert, Alan Beard, and Ronan Hession. The MIRLive team will put out a call for submissions for each event and readers may also be selected from the wider submissions pool. As we read your submissions, we may find a piece of work that we feel would be excellent read aloud and will get in touch to ask you to appear at one of our spoken-word events. If you feel that your work would be great for MIRLive, please do flag this up to us in your submissions email. Find out how to submit your work to The Mechanics’ Institute Review here. Submissions for MIRLive should be prose of up to 1500 words and poetry up to 150 lines. If your work is selected, you will be asked to provide a brief (+- 50 words) biography written in the 3rd person, and a photo, to include on a handout and publish on the website. Subject to the author’s permission, a podcast of the reading may be made available on the website. Copyright remains with the individual autho For more information visit the MIR Online website.   Featured image by Photo by Joshua...

read more

In Conversation with Jaspreet Kaur

Posted by on 11:52 am in News | 0 comments

In Conversation with Jaspreet Kaur

Friday 26 February, Format: Online, 6.30-8pm Please book a place here Spoken word artist and teacher Jaspreet Kaur will be in conversation with  Dr Ben Worthy (Birkbeck) to discuss her new memoir/manifesto Brown Girl Like Me (forthcoming Autumn 2021). The event is organised in connection with Jaspreet's work as the current Ben PiImlott Writer in Residence and is co-organised by the Birkbeck Centre for British Political Life and the Centre for Contemporary Literature. Brown Girl Like Me is an inspiring memoir-manifesto challenging existing portrayals of young South Asian women in the UK; providing a millennial perspective on how brown women navigate and balance the intersectionality of their identities in the new political climate. This book will ask and answer urgent questions about the current state of the world for young British Asian women through interviews with brown women across the country. Brown Girl Like Me aims to empower, support and equip brown women with the confidence and tools to navigate the difficulties that come with an intersectional identity, unpacking key issues such as the home, the media, the workplace, education, mental health, culture, confidence and the body.  For more information about Jaspreet, see here: http://www.behindthenetra.com/ For more information about Jaspreet's memoir-manifesto, Brown Girl Like Me, see here: https://www.thebookseller.com/news/bluebird-snaps-kaurs-agenda-setting-debut-1206744#   Featured image on the website homepage by Bold Content shared under a CC By 2.0...

read more